April 14, 2024

The father who stabbed his two young children and sister-in-law to death before turning the knife on himself had undergone a ‘detailed’ mental health assessment at a hospital just a month earlier, it has emerged.

Medical staff spoke to Bartlomiej Kuczynski, 45, when police brought him in after finding him near his home following a missing person report.

But they concluded he was no risk to himself or others and he left Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital unaccompanied later the same day.

A spokeswoman for the hospital in Norwich said: ‘He did have quite a detailed, comprehensive assessment.

‘Normally, if you come to A&E they’ll triage you first then you see someone. Because he was brought in by police there was an assessment but he left after a couple of hours. There was no reason to detain him in the hospital.’

The question of whether warning signs could have been spotted earlier will probably feature in an inquest into the deaths.

Medical staff spoke to Bartlomiej Kuczynski, 45, (left) when police brought him in after finding him near his home following a missing person report

Medical staff spoke to Bartlomiej Kuczynski, 45, (left) when police brought him in after finding him near his home following a missing person report

Sisters Jasmin (left) and Natasha (right), aged 12 and eight respectively died from multiple stab wounds to the neck

Sisters Jasmin (left) and Natasha (right), aged 12 and eight respectively died from multiple stab wounds to the neck

Police are pictured outside the house in Norfolk where the four bodies were found

Police are pictured outside the house in Norfolk where the four bodies were found 

The case is already being scrutinised by the Independent Office for Police Conduct after Norfolk Police referred themselves to the watchdog for failing to respond to a 999 call from Polish-born Mr Kuczynski on the morning of the deaths in which he spoke of his ‘confused’ mental state.

It has also referred the December 14 incident when he was taken to hospital to the IOPC.

Nearby woodland was searched with the help of a drone before he was located in a road near the family’s semi-detached house.

IOPC regional director Charmaine Arbouin said: ‘Following a mandatory referral from the force we have decided to investigate and will be examining if the force’s handling of the contact they had with the man was appropriate and in line with force policy, training and procedures.

‘We will be making contact with the families of the deceased to explain our role.’

Mr Kuczynski’s wife, Thai-born Nanthaka Kuczynska, works at Norfolk and Norwich Hospital where she is understood to be a healthcare assistant.

She was not at home when her family members were killed.

The hospital does not specialise in mental health services, which are handled by the Norfolk and Suffolk NHS Foundation Trust, but its A&E department can be used for urgent assessments.

It added in a statement: ‘We can confirm that the patient was taken to the emergency department by police on December 14.

‘Following a comprehensive clinical assessment, the patient was assessed as having mental capacity and he left the unit before being reviewed again by the team.’

Mr Kuczynski called police at around 6am last Friday and mentioned his fragile mental state.

Kanticha Sukpengpanao, 36 ¿ who arrived in the UK on December 27 to help care for the Jasmin and Natasha - also died from multiple stab wounds to the neck

Kanticha Sukpengpanao, 36 – who arrived in the UK on December 27 to help care for the Jasmin and Natasha – also died from multiple stab wounds to the neck

Mr Kuczynski (pictured) was found to have a single knife wound in his neck, suggesting his death was the result of suicide

Mr Kuczynski (pictured) was found to have a single knife wound in his neck, suggesting his death was the result of suicide

Floral tributes left near the house in Norfolk

Floral tributes left near the house in Norfolk 

Police found the bodies after forcing their way into the house

Police found the bodies after forcing their way into the house

Officers weren’t despatched, however, and only turned up when a member of public rang with concerns an hour later. They found the bodies after forcing their way into the house.

Post-mortem examinations have revealed sisters Jasmin and Natasha, aged 12 and eight respectively, and their aunt Kanticha Sukpengpanao, 36 – who arrived in the UK on December 27 to help care for the girls – died from multiple stab wounds to the neck.

Mr Kuczynski was found to have a single knife wound in his neck, suggesting his death was the result of suicide.

Norfolk Police said in a statement: ‘Detectives have confirmed that the deaths of Kanticha, Jasmin and Natasha are being treated as murder.

‘The death of Bartlomiej is not being treated as suspicious and officers are not looking for anyone else in connection with the deaths.’

The force is phasing in a scheme called Right Person, Right Care, which will limit how often officers attend mental health-related call-outs to allow them to focus on other incidents. The scheme is being adopted by other forces around the country.

But a mental health charity today warned other people will die as a result.

Mark Harrison, of the Campaign to Save Mental Health in Norfolk and Suffolk, told the BBC: ‘We think there will be severe consequences. We think people will die as a result of the introduction of this scheme.

‘It’s not safe – it’s not been piloted, it’s not got any additional resources and it will be a disaster. I think immediately it needs to be paused, then it needs to be scrapped.’

Norfolk Police have said officers would still attend incidents where there is believed to be an immediate threat to life.

The county’s police and crime commissioner, Giles Orpen-Smellie, has stated he will ‘robustly’ hold the chief constable to account for the actions of officers and other staff.

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